Marc Trumphour (Remax Hallmark)

2237 Queen Street East

Toronto , ON M4E 1G1




Marc Trumphour is dedicated to presenting buyers and sellers the most useful real estate information. His focus is the listings that highlight only the best MLS properties just listed on the market.

Get to know Marc Trumphour

Marc Trumphour brings a unique approach to the task of selling your home. ReMax requires that only the best agents in their chosen field be hired to facilitate the sale of homes in their market area. With a consistent market share around 35%, you can be assured that ReMax Hallmark will bring in more Buyers for your home than any other company in your neighborhood.

My Background

As a Toronto Beaches real estate agent, I bring a wealth of experience working with people and helping them find solutions to their problems.

I have a degree in social work and previously spent 7 years with a national, 1-800 children's crisis phone line (Kids help Phone) counseling youth and adults. My area of focus has been dispute resolution and crisis counseling. In addition, I also ran my own customer service business for two years in the GTA.

As a result, my skill set is unique. It combines the skills of a counselor with that of a businessperson. Most importantly, these experiences have provided me real insight into the importance of understanding and listening to people's needs.

My Style

In 2000, I was involved with the sale of over 35 Toronto Beaches homes -- representing more than a half of a million worth of real estate each month.

This success is due, in large part, to the fact that I take the time to understand who you are and the type of home you really want in a no pressure environment.

My goal is simple: to help you find the right home at the best price.

Marc Trumphour's Blog Posts

Certifications

Toronto Beaches Real EstateAt the beginning of the 20th century, this was literally a village, a place of summer homes reachable by streetcar. Today, long since being claimed as part of the central city, it nevertheless retains a village air, a sense of community. This local pride has only been enhanced by the rise in house prices and the prosperity of Queen East, which operates like a combination of an English market town's high street and a California resort community's retail strip. Kew Beach Park, which begins in the midst of the commercial area at Queen Street provides the community focus for everything from baseball games to open-air jazz concerts. Planners long ago attached the park to a boardwalk and a beach that run for at least a mile along Lake Ontario, which means that people living in the area have more close-to-home recreation space than anyone else in the old city. That's one reason why the Beach retains it status as the most popular section of eastern Toronto for homebuyers. The housing stock here is eccentric, to say the least: it's not at all odd to see a handsome Edwardian brick building cheeked by a modern home.

 

Riverdale Toronto HomesOnly a decade or two ago, Riverdale was dull, and snobs from the Annex spoke of it with distain as a more or less blank spot on the map, "out the Danforth." But today, this community of 28,300, just east of the Don River, has achieved life, vibrancy and a warm place in the hearts of real estate people: last year houses here sold for an average of $263,000. If they're priced according to market value, homes tend to sell within two weeks and often with multiple offers, which tend to up the sale price in the end. The streets running east of Broadview are tree-rich, with many a magnificent old maple. This is a family neighbourhood, and for excellent reasons: Many of the sturdy old homes from the 1920s have long backyards much larger than those across the river in Cabbagetown. The area attracts residents of all flavours: on one short strip of Riverdale Avenue, you can encounter a gay-activist chiropractor, a stockbroker and a married couple. Just to the north is the Danforth commercial strip, which pulse with energy all year long, but comes to life in the summer.

Danforth Real EstateSuccessful districts often acquire appendages, so it's only fair that the relatively humble streets that once were classified merely as above Kingston Road have now been awarded the name Upper Beach. These streets hold 18,216 people, whose average annual income is almost $60,000. More than half the residents own their own homes, about 60 per cent of which were build before 1946. The neighbourhood has a lot going for it besides affordable real estate. The crime rate here is comfortably low, it has good access to downtown via subway or car (down Woodbine and along the Gardiner Expressway), and it's not far from all the green space walking paths and street like of the Beach to the south. The chief cultural institution of the Upper Beach is Malvern Collegiate, which has given the world Norman Jewison, Glenn Gould, and John Sewell.

Languages (1)
  • English